How do lazy rivers work?

By Mike Wright February 13, 2014


Lazy River

Lazy River

Property managers and pool renovation services are aware of the growing popularity of waterpark elements in commercial pools. Though you may not be able to bring the relaxation of a lazy river into your facility, it’s good to know how these work and what sort of benefits they provide.

The slow current keep swimmers of all ages entertained. It’s a waterpark amenity that is less high-energy in comparison to water slides and spray nozzles. These appeal to an audience that’s looking for slower paced fun and can be an easier area for waterpark lifeguards to supervise.

Operating a lazy river
The gentle flow of water that lazy rivers boast is provided by current systems, which consist of flow couple jets and intake locations. These work together to ensure that the flow is consistent and even throughout the lazy river. Furthermore, the overall architectural design of the site is essential to a lazy river’s performance.

Maintaining accordingly
For waterparks, implementing a feature that introduces current into a pool has inherent risks. Though the water is slow-moving, the design may create a bottleneck. Management services and lifeguards have to assess high traffic areas and figure out best practices to protect swimmers.

Furthermore, lazy rivers require different maintenance procedures. Contaminants and debris ride along the current, which means that facilities have to figure out best practices when it comes to maintaining this amenity.

Considering the activities
With lazy rivers, swimmers can go on rides on inflatable pool floats. Though attendance may decrease off-season, indoor facilities with a lazy river garner interest with rubber duck races, which won’t require participants to enter the water unless they’d like to. For these sites, it’s a great way to encourage interactive poolside fun without actually getting wet.

Drawing inspiration
You can create your own temporary lazy river by having volunteers create a current with boogie boards. Set up simple barriers that mimic the effects of a lazy river with pool noodles. This may require staff members to enter the water. You can hold a rubber duck race during the quieter season without too much effort or having to figure out how to install a lazy river on the property.

Creating novel activities for your facility sometimes means finding the equipment you can’t implement and finding ways to offer the same type and level of fun, which can create a friendly community atmosphere through teamwork.