Balance interactive fixtures and pool programs

By American Pool Marketing May 7, 2014 ,


 

Balance interactive fixtures and programs

Balance interactive fixtures and programs

Pool management is a tricky business. People constantly look for waterpark amenities at pools, which can be implemented, but you should also consider what interactive fixtures mean for your swimming lessons and physical therapy sessions.

Pool size will play a direct role in your ability to feature both interactive fixtures and pool programs in the same setting. If you have a small pool, it may be tempting to dedicate it completely to water slides and spray nozzles. But this can be detrimental to the success of your pool programs. On the other hand, if you focus too much on pool programs and choose not to invest in interactive features, swimmer attendance may decline. So how do you find the perfect balance?

Recognize the effects of decisions
Your annual budget may not allow for multiple projects at once. If you’re looking to explore a new area of swimming, consider small long-term investments rather than a large remodel that will be finished in a few months. This way, if the new fixtures aren’t garnering as much attention as you had thought, you can shift the focus for future projects, such as increasing the number of pool programs that your pool runs.

The key is flexibility
Pools rely on the community for attendance. A new elementary school can introduce a need for expanding children’s swimming classes or even renting the facility out to the school. A new fitness trend may warrant the expansion of aquatic fitness programming. Being flexible in your planning can allow you to better meet the needs of swimmers in and around your community.

Pool programs can be an effective way to establish your pool’s presence in the area. These can be managed in-house, outsourced or collaborated on. Collaboration will require the most flexibility, but it can pay off. Aquatics International interviewed Drew Schoenster, the assistant aquatics director at the Wilton Family YMCA. Schoenster stressed the importance of being open to changes in order to meet clientele needs.

A multifunctional pool will allow you to take advantage of two types of pool activity. Properly balancing the aspects of each area carefully will ensure that one doesn’t overshadow the other.