Review these 2 aspects of your power outage plan

By Daniel Lawler August 1, 2014


2 aspects of your power outage plan to review

2 aspects of your power outage plan to review

There are many pieces of equipment that keep a pool running properly. Pool maintenance specialists are essential for aquatic facilities because they have the training and knowledge necessary to check on the many working parts and troubleshoot any potential problems that may arise.

However, as a pool director, you’re fully aware that there are many other troubles that may occur without warning. While not all of these can be avoided, such as power outages, the pool and employees can prepare for such emergencies.

Implement a contingency plan
Though certain maintenance components can be powered off during non-operational hours, there are many others that need to keep running in order to maintain the water for safety and cleanliness. This is especially important during peak season when prospective patrons can be disappointed by a pool that’s closed due to maintenance problems.

Here are two aspects of your power outage plan to review.

1. Inspect each piece of equipment: For this, you’ll need to call in your pool maintenance technicians. Let them know that any part that may need replacing should be noted in writing. This way, you’ll be able to accurately document any components that need to be changed. Creating a list early on in peak season will ensure that you’re aware of the most prominent problems and can take care of them early on. Additionally, reviewing these items with your maintenance technicians can reveal a problem that might arise during a power outage. No part is inconsequential, and familiarizing yourself with each one can prepare you for potential issues.

2. Review training: Reopening a pool following a power outage isn’t a matter of simply turning on the equipment and returning to normal operations. Certified specialists also have to check the water quality for safety both by sight and with chemical testing methods. Figuring out whether the water is safe may require some time because the water in the pool will need to recirculate before any conclusions can be drawn.

If necessary, assemble a power outage task force. Ensure that these individuals are willing to head into work following blackouts to ensure that the pool reopens as soon as possible. Having many hands helping out with the numerous tasks will give your facility the best chances of returning to normal quickly and safely.