3 tips for directors considering pool construction projects

By American Pool Marketing July 28, 2014


Tips for directors considering pool construction projects

Tips for directors considering pool construction projects

Deciding to take on a new construction project at an aquatic facility is a big deal. It’s something that will impact pool maintenance technicians and managers.

Additionally, everyone has to worry about the timeline. Even the best-planned projects can run into unforeseen problems, which can delay the finish date. This is especially important if it involves an amenity, as guests may be disappointed if the grand unveiling has to be postponed.

Make it a team effort
The new addition will impact all the departments involved in pool operations, so include managers from every office. This will ensure that everyone who works at the pool is on the same page at all times. Working closely with the construction team is essential as well. This way, you’ll always be up to date on progress and learn about any problems early on. This information is valuable in helping you make decisions that’ll impact pool patrons.

Here are three other ways to include every pool employee, which will ease your personal workload and provide the utmost safety for swimmers.

1. Hold a pool-wide meeting: Whether you’re replacing the deck or are converting the wading pool into a spray pad, every staff member should be aware of the project before it begins. Depending on the setup, certain routines may have to change because employees won’t be able to enter construction zones. Optimize communication with team members by giving them time to digest the information and ask any questions.

2. Ask for extra help: The grand opening will undoubtedly draw in many guests. If you normally staff one lifeguard, staffing another one can ensure that pool patrons are exploring the new area safely. Learning how to use the amenity for guests is as important as figuring out safety best practices for lifeguards. Chances are, you won’t have trouble finding someone who’s willing to work an extra shift because it’s an exciting change that everyone will want to check out.

3. Consider all scenarios: Safety can always be improved upon. This is especially true for new pool amenities. You never know what might happen, so invite others to speak up about any potential issues that may arise. Who knows? Maybe the receptionist will notice a problematic area that everyone else overlooked. Include everyone in this discussion.